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KRISS 10MM Vector On The Range

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The Kriss Vector made a splash when it was introduced in the .45 ACP caliber in 2009, since then Vector enthusiasts have been clamoring for more calibers and configurations. Kriss has now introduced a 10mm Vector that is sure to make the most decerning of gun hipster very happy. The new 10mm version is almost identical to the .45 version with the only real change being the caliber and some internal parts.

KRISS 10MM Vector

U.S.A. –-(Ammoland.com)- The rifle arrived in the configuration seen below with the handguard uninstalled. Since I prefer to get my support hand out as far as possible, fitting the rail was a high priority.

Like other Vectors, the 10mm version has the safety in an AR esque position that is reasonably easy to operate but not quite as easy as most AR-15 selectors. I would prefer a slightly extended paddle on the dominant thumb side to make taking the safety off a bit easier. Flipping the safety back on is quite easy when you use the index finger of your firing hand.

The rifle arrived in the configuration seen below with the handguard uninstalled.
The rifle arrived in the configuration seen below with the handguard uninstalled.
Like other Vectors, the 10mm version has the safety in an AR esque position that is reasonably easy to operate but not quite as easy as most AR-15 selectors.
Like other Vectors, the 10mm version has the safety in an AR esque position that is reasonably easy to operate but not quite as easy as most AR-15 selectors.

The rest of the controls are again the same as all other Vectors. The charging handle is a side mounted unit that is spring loaded to keep it tucked out of the way. The bolt catch is a very large paddle that has some raised fences that keep it from being depressed inadvertently. Kriss uses a factory Glock mag catch with their own button screwed into the polymer part allowing you to get the mag out of the gun fast and easy when the support hand is used.

The rest of the controls are again the same as all other Vectors.
The rest of the controls are again the same as all other Vectors.

The folding irons that are supplied with the Vector are their own Defiance branded units. I found them to be entirely serviceable and don’t see much reason to change them out, especially if you plan on running a red dot or other optics.

The folding irons that are supplied with the Vector are their own Defiance branded units.
The folding irons that are supplied with the Vector are their own Defiance branded units.

Something to note is that the polymer seemed to not react as well as I would have liked to the hard ejecting 10mm brass. While I don’t know how much this writer’s sample had been shot before I got it after my range say there was some noticeable wear on the ejection port.

Noticeable wear on the ejection port from 10mm. (Note could be from extended use on writer's sample)
Noticeable wear on the ejection port from 10mm. (Note could be from extended use on writer’s sample)

Again, the layout is identical to other Vectors, most specifically the .45 ACP version since both .45 and 10mm take large frame Glock mags. The pistol grip is rather comfortable and I am not the slightest bit upset that I can’t change it out for another like I would be able to on an AR.

Accepts GLOCK mags!
Accepts Glock mags!

The takedown of the rifle is accomplished with HK style pins that are easily removable without tools. The lower is the serialized part, my only real annoyance with the Vector. If the upper was the serialized part, caliber conversions on SBRed Vectors would be a thing and would make the platform so much more attractive to me.

The takedown of the rifle is accomplished with HK style pins that are easily removable without tools.
The takedown of the rifle is accomplished with HK style pins that are easily removable without tools.

At the heart of the rifle lives the Super V system that helps mitigate a lot of the muzzle rise that more conventional designs exhibit. The often overlooked fact that the bolt is non-locking and operate off blowback like many early sub guns but has less recoil than most locked breech pistol caliber rifles.

At the heart of the rifle lives the Super V system that helps mitigate a lot of the muzzle rise that more conventional designs exhibit.
At the heart of the rifle lives the Super V system that helps mitigate a lot of the muzzle rise that more conventional designs exhibit.

The stock on my test unit is a non-folding Defiance part with a QD socket to make slapping a sling onto the rifle easy as pie. The stock was fine and I don’t see much reason to change it, the Defiance part has all the features I would want personally.

Non-folding Defiance stock included with Kriss VECTOR
Non-folding Defiance stock included with Kriss VECTOR

Remember when I said that I fitted a handguard to the rifle? Well this is how the Vector looks when it comes out of the box. You get two threaded inserts that are molded into the lower of the rifle on each side that mate up with the handguard’s screw holes.

This is how the Vector looks when it comes out of the box.
This is how the Vector looks when it comes out of the box.

I have been told that Kriss is working on an M-LOK version of the handguard, but this one was available at the time the rifle was sent to me. Additional pic rails can be attached with screws to the threaded holes.

Kriss did a wonderful job of designing the rail to really fit the feel of the Vector. I was really pleased with the aesthetics and fitment but I guess that is to be expected from an OEM part.

Kriss did a wonderful job of designing the rail to really fit the feel of the Vector.
Kriss did a wonderful job of designing the rail to really fit the feel of the Vector.

Dropping 10mm rounds exactly where I wanted them was easy with the included irons. I am not a fan of accuracy testing since I see it as largely useless. So many factors change that the results are rarely repeatable by more than one shooter.

Dropping 10mm rounds exactly where I wanted them was easy with the included irons.
Dropping 10mm rounds exactly where I wanted them was easy with the included irons.

On the range, I spent quite a lot of time putting ammo through the rifle and had only one malfunction, a failure to feed that pushed the bullet deep into the case. I found the recoil impulse to be pleasant and rather controllable, almost too controllable. The Super V system was so effective that I even found the muzzle dipping much lower than expected when the trigger was pulled.

On the Range with the Kriss Vector 10mm
On the Range with the Kriss Vector 10mm

So would I buy one of these? Probably not. 10mm carbines just aren’t really my thing and I can’t find a practical use for it, but if you are in the market for a 10mm carbine, there are few other options I would seriously consider. With an MSRP of $1519, the 10mm Vector is right in the ballpark of other quality pistol caliber carbines. Sure there are some out there that are cheaper, but when compared to similar quality rifles, it falls right in line.

If you want to learn more about the 10mm Vector, make sure to check out Kriss USA or the 10mm Vector product page.


About Patrick R.Patrick Roberts

Patrick is a firearms enthusiast that values the quest for not only the best possible gear setup, but also pragmatic ways to improve his shooting skills across a wide range of disciplines. He values truthful, honest information above all else and had committed to cutting through marketing fluff to deliver the truth. You can find the rest of his work on FirearmRack.com as well as on the YouTube channel Firearm Rack or Instagram at @thepatrickroberts.



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