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More Revelations at Former Officer Goines Federal Bond Hearing from No-Knock Raid

Second Amendment


Opinion

Dennis Tuttle and Rhogena Nicholas were the victims.

Arizona -(Ammoland.com)- There was a federal bond hearing for former Houston Police Officer Gerald Goines last week after his arrest on 20 November, 2019.

In the hearing for Goines, FBI special agent O’Neil Brown testified about more evidence found in Goines’ official, but unmarked Houston Police Department car. From click2houston.com:

Brown’s testimony brought forward new revelations about the investigation into Goines’ alleged activities. He testified that Goines was involved in a sexual relationship with one of his confidential informants. This same confidential informant told investigators the drugs Goines said were purchased from 7815 Harding Street came from a different address — one unrelated to Dennis Tuttle and Rhogena Nicholas, Brown testified. Brown also said investigators discovered a stolen gun in Goines’ unmarked HPD unit and various illegal drugs, including cocaine, and ecstasy.

It appears former officer Goines had more illegal drugs and illegal guns in his car than their victims, the Tuttles had. They had only a small amount of marijuana, and a small amount of cocaine discovered in their modest home, where they had lived quiet lives for the last 20 years since they had married.

Dennis Tuttle, 59,  was a medically retired Navy veteran. Rhogena Nicholas, 58, his wife, a devout Christian who emailed a prayer to her mother every day. Both were killed in the no-knock raid at their 7815 Harding Street Houston residence. based on lies from a neighbor across the street and the false “evidence” by former officer Goines to obtain the warrant.

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Goines,  his partner Steven M. Bryant, 46, and the neighbor, Patricia Ann Garcia, 53, were arrested on federal warrants after an FBI investigation prompted by the raid and double homicide.

Goines,  his partner Steven M. Bryant, 46, and the neighbor, Patricia Ann Garcia, 53, were arrested on federal warrants after an FBI investigation prompted by the raid and double homicide.

In the interest of justice, it appears Dennis Tuttle fought back against the armed home invaders, who had shot and killed his dog in his living room, with virtually no warning. The home invaders were undercover narcotics police. Four officers were wounded. One of those was Gerald Goines. Goines was the lead investigator in the case.

Goines was wounded in the neck, and unable to talk. He was in the hospital for some time. The wound may have prevented him from coordinating a more extensive coverup.

It seems doubtful he would have left a stolen gun in his vehicle if he had the chance to remove it. Previous revelations by his partner, Bryant, showed there had been heroin in the car as well. Some of the heroin found in his official car might have ended up at the 7815 address if he had not been prevented from planting it there.

From kut.org:

Authorities allege Goines lied in a search warrant affidavit when he said that a confidential informant had bought heroin at the home. But the informant told investigators no such drug buy ever took place. Goines had indicated in the search warrant that Bryant had identified heroin bought at the home. But Bryant later told investigators he had retrieved heroin from Goines’ police car.

Dennis’ Tuttles guns were all legal, it appears.

It has been reported that Goines was involved in over 100 no-knock warrants in the seven years previous to the Harding Street no-knock raid. His informants, in the documents used to obtain the warrants, swore guns had been seen in all of them. Mysteriously, no guns were reported as being seized by Goines, after the raids were finished.  From khou.com:

Goines swore in search warrant affidavits that “knocking and announcing would be dangerous, futile,” because he claimed a confidential informant had seen a gun inside. Those claims led judges to grant no-knock warrants, which accounted for 96 percent of all the search warrants he filed in the last seven years, a KHOU 11 Investigation has found.

But in every one of the more than 100 drug cases based off those warrants, there’s no record of Goines ever seizing a gun after executing a no-knock search warrant.

The discovery of a stolen gun in Goines official car fuels speculation about what may have happened to all the guns that might have been discovered in those previous raids.

Police Chief Acevedo stated, in a recent press conference, that if you go to a random number of residences in Texas, more than half are going to have guns.

From the press conference:

“..most houses, I would say a greater number, you would find firearms than not.”

What would the percentage be if those residences were being used by drug dealers who informants had swore had guns on the premises?

When those who wish us disarmed talk about laws to disarm the innocent, they carefully refrain from mentioning corrupt police and the black market.


About Dean Weingarten:

Dean Weingarten has been a peace officer, a military officer, was on the University of Wisconsin Pistol Team for four years, and was first certified to teach firearms safety in 1973. He taught the Arizona concealed carry course for fifteen years until the goal of constitutional carry was attained. He has degrees in meteorology and mining engineering, and recently retired from the Department of Defense after a 30 year career in Army Research, Development, Testing, and Evaluation.



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